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Archive for April, 2016

RuPaul on politics

In this week’s  MetroWeekly :

RUPAUL: I don’t really do the politics. I think the most important politics are personal politics. What an individual feels from the inside out. And that’s where real change happens. It happens on a personal level.
I remember when Marianne Williamson was going to run for Congress here in California, and I asked her why. The impact she has on a personal level is far more important and far more reaching than she could do in some stodgy, bureaucratic committee. Personal politics is really what it’s all about. You change the world on a personal level, by changing yourself.
I have no faith in politics or Washington. I don’t look to them to determine how free I am, or how I view myself as equal. Because they will never get it. They don’t have the software or the hardware to understand what that’s really about.
MW: Switching gears, what was the inspiration behind your new album, Butch Queen?
RUPAULButch Queen is me paying homage to the strength of drag queens. If you read George Orwell’s Animal Farm, it really chronicles the way humans behave in a revolution. They start it with the idea of freedom or equality, and then essentially, over time, forget what the purpose was. And they end up wanting to just assimilate into what the status quo was. What they were rebelling against in the first place. And in different times, people start walking on their hind legs like the pigs in Animal Farm and they forget where the strength came from. Their true colors come out over time. Another part of that is that people end up forgetting why they had a revolution in the first place. It becomes very clear that people really just want [what they had before]. The new boss, same as the old boss.
I’ve said this before, drag queens are like the Marines of the LGBT movement. We suit up, we show up, and we’re always ready to serve. And we don’t get that credit.

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Go Ahead Boycott, but at Your Own Peril

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Conversations with Tyler: A Conversation with Camille Paglia

April 12, 2016
3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
George Mason University Arlington
3351 Fairfax Drive, 4th Floor
Arlington, Virginia 22201
Camille Paglia–cultural critic, intellectual provocateur, and feminist icon–will join Tyler Cowen for a wide-ranging dialogue as part of the Mercatus Center’s Conversations with Tyler event series. Paglia, one of the world’s great polymaths, will engage Cowen on a number of topics from Edmund Spenser to the Rolling Stones to Carly Fiorina.
Author of the controversial tour-de-force Sexual Personae, Paglia is a self-described dissident and free-speech libertarian who is renowned for her brilliant and scathing critiques of modern culture, covering everything from the arts to philosophy to politics. She is well-known as an academic who loves to challenge cultural stigmas and public reactions to controversial subjects.
She is the University Professor of Humanities and Media Studies at the University of the Arts, where she has taught since she was hired by the Humanities department of the Philadelphia College of Performing Arts in 1984.
Her six books are Sexual Personae: Art and Decadence from Nefertiti to Emily Dickinson (1990); Sex, Art, and American Culture: Essays (1992); Vamps & Tramps: New Essays (1994); The Birds (1998), a study of Alfred Hitchcock published by the British Film Institute in its Film Classics Series; Break, Blow, Burn: Camille Paglia Reads Forty-Three of the World’s Best Poems (2005); and Glittering Images: A Journey through Art from Egypt to Star Wars (2012). Her third essay collection is forthcoming from Pantheon Books.
About the Conversations with Tyler Event Series:
The Mercatus Center’s Conversations with Tyler series brings world-class thought leaders to the Arlington campus of George Mason University to discuss how ideas, cutting-edge research, and applied economics can bring solutions to society’s most pressing problems.

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