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Diana Hsieh
On Sunday’s Philosophy in Action Radio, I answered a question about the validity of gay marriage. It’s here: 


The question was: 

Is “gay marriage” a valid form of marriage? Many people oppose gay marriage on the grounds that marriage is essentially religious, that procreation is central to marriage, or “traditional marriage” should be respected. Should gay unions be considered a valid form of marriage, legally or socially? Might civil unions be an acceptable alternative?


My Answer, In Brief: The various quasi-secular arguments against gay marriage fail, badly. Gay marriage is a matter of rights, and people ought to support it. 


Again, you can listen to my answer, check out the links, and post comments here: 


A podcast of the full episode – where I answered questions on the validity of gay marriage, the is-ought gap, the aftermath of a friendship, mixing politics and romance, and more – is available here: Episode of 7 April 2013

About Philosophy in Action Radio 


Philosophy in Action Radio applies rational principles to the challenges of real life in live internet radio shows on Sunday mornings and Wednesday evenings. For information on upcoming shows, visit the Episodes on Tap. For podcasts of past shows, visit the Show Archives.

— Diana Hsieh (Ph.D, Philosophy) 
 
 

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On Sunday’s Philosophy in Action Radio, Greg Perkins and I will answer questions on replying to intrusive inquiries, changing minds on gay marriage, dealing with overzealous ideologues, buying from Chinese companies, and more. I thought that the question on changing minds on gay marriage might be of particular interest. That question is: 

How might social conservatives be convinced to support gay marriage? Rob Portman, a Republican Senator from Ohio, recently decided to openly support gay marriage after his son came out to him and his wife. What can be done to help other conservatives see gay marriage in a new light – as a matter of liberty and individual identity?


This episode of internet radio airs at 8 am PT / 9 MT / 10 CT / 11 ET on Sunday, 31 March 2013, in our live studio. If you miss that live broadcast, you can always listen to the podcast later. 

To join the live broadcast and its chat, just point your browser to Philosophy in Action’s Live Studio a few minutes before the show is scheduled to start. By listening live, you can share your thoughts with other listeners and ask us follow-up questions in the text chat. 

If you miss the live broadcast, you’ll find the podcast from the episode posted in the archive: Radio Archive: Q&A: Protecting Privacy, Gay Marriage, Chinese Goods, and More. It will be posted on Monday morning, if not sooner. You can automatically download that and other podcasts by subscribing to Philosophy in Action’s Podcast RSS Feed:


I hope you join us on Sunday morning! 

Philosophy in Action Radio applies rational principles to the challenges of real life in live internet radio shows on Sunday mornings and Wednesday evenings. For information on upcoming shows, visit the Episodes on Tap. For podcasts of past shows, visit the Show Archives.



— Diana Hsieh (Ph.D, Philosophy) 
    Philosophy in Action

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“What would Clint do?”



For making me selfish
When I am unsteady
“Thank you,” Ayn Rand,
I feel better already!


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Objectivist philosopher Diana Hsieh, and, on the other hand, many leftover gays on Al Gore’s internets, charge that Ron Paul opposes gay marriage, or is eager at any rate to leave it up to the states so they can outlaw it.  No doubt Gary Johnson has a superior position on the issue.  But does anyone else, including our “evolving” President, Barack Obama?

Dr. Hsieh recently told some of her readers:

Ron Paul is clearly better on this issue than Rick Santorum (who is a theocrat, par excellence).  But it’s wrong to say that he “recognizes that gay citizens are entitled to the same rights as all other citizens.”  RP is opposed to gay marriage, and he supports the Defense of Marriage Act.  Here’s an essay of his on the subject:

http://www.lewrockwell.com/paul/paul207.html

His support of DOMA is exactly why I say that his respect for the constitution goes out the window when he’s got some religious values to promote.  The Full Faith and Credit Clause should mean that the marriages of one state must be recognized by other states.  DOMA denies that, and it’s unconstitutional on that basis.

Here’s what the Constitution says:

“Full faith and credit ought to be given in each state to the public acts, records, and judicial proceedings, of every other state; and the legislature shall, by general laws, prescribe the manner in which such acts, records, and proceedings, shall be proved, and the effect which judgments, obtained in one state, shall have in another.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_Faith_and_Credit_Clause

And she did an interactive podcast some weeks back that we promoted here where she evaluated Paul, Johnson, Romney and Gingrich on this among other issues.

However in 2004 Dr. Paul seems to have been one of the few Republicans to vote with Democrats to restrict the federal government’s ability to interfere with what state’s legislate about marriage in their own state.

FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 484(Republicans in roman; Democrats in italic; Independents underlined)

      H J RES 106      2/3 YEA-AND-NAY      30-Sep-2004      5:25 PM
      QUESTION:  On Passage
      BILL TITLE: Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States relating to marriage

YEAS NAYS PRES NV
REPUBLICAN 191 27 9
DEMOCRATIC 36 158 11
INDEPENDENT 1
TOTALS 227 186 20


—- YEAS    227 —

Aderholt
Akin
Alexander
Bachus
Baker
Ballenger
Barrett (SC)
Bartlett (MD)
Barton (TX)
Beauprez
Berry
Bilirakis
Bishop (GA)
Bishop (UT)
Blackburn
Blunt
Boehner
Bonilla
Bonner
Boozman
Boucher
Boyd
Bradley (NH)
Brady (TX)
Brown (SC)
Brown-Waite, Ginny
Burgess
Burns
Burr
Burton (IN)
Buyer
Calvert
Camp
Cantor
Capito
Carson (OK)
Carter
Chabot
Chandler
Chocola
Coble
Cole
Collins
Cooper
Costello
Cramer
Crane
Crenshaw
Cubin
Culberson
Cunningham
Davis (AL)
Davis (TN)
Davis, Jo Ann
Davis, Tom
Deal (GA)
DeLay
DeMint
Doolittle
Duncan
Edwards
Ehlers
Emerson
English
Etheridge
Everett
Feeney
Ferguson
Flake
Forbes
Ford
Fossella
Franks (AZ)
Gallegly
Garrett (NJ)
Gillmor
Gingrey
Goode
Goodlatte
Gordon
Granger
Graves
Green (WI)
Gutknecht
Hall
Harris
Hart
Hastert
Hastings (WA)
Hayes
Hayworth
Hefley
Hensarling
Herger
Herseth
Hoekstra
Holden
Hulshof
Hyde
Isakson
Issa
Istook
Jefferson
Jenkins
John
Johnson (IL)
Johnson, Sam
Jones (NC)
Keller
Kelly
Kennedy (MN)
King (IA)
King (NY)
Kingston
Kline
LaHood
Lampson
Latham
LaTourette
Lewis (CA)
Lewis (KY)
Linder
LoBiondo
Lucas (KY)
Lucas (OK)
Manzullo
Marshall
Matheson
McCotter
McCrery
McHugh
McIntyre
McKeon
Mica
Miller (FL)
Miller (MI)
Miller, Gary
Moran (KS)
Murphy
Musgrave
Myrick
Neugebauer
Ney
Northup
Norwood
Nunes
Nussle
Ortiz
Osborne
Otter
Oxley
Pearce
Pence
Peterson (MN)
Peterson (PA)
Petri
Pickering
Pitts
Platts
Pombo
Porter
Portman
Putnam
Quinn
Radanovich
Rahall
Ramstad
Regula
Rehberg
Renzi
Reynolds
Rogers (AL)
Rogers (KY)
Rogers (MI)
Rohrabacher
Ross
Royce
Ryan (WI)
Ryun (KS)
Sandlin
Saxton
Schrock
Scott (GA)
Sensenbrenner
Sessions
Shadegg
Shaw
Sherwood
Shimkus
Shuster
Simpson
Skelton
Smith (MI)
Smith (NJ)
Smith (TX)
Souder
Spratt
Stearns
Stenholm
Sullivan
Tancredo
Tanner
Taylor (MS)
Taylor (NC)
Terry
Thomas
Thompson (MS)
Thornberry
Tiahrt
Tiberi
Toomey
Turner (OH)
Upton
Vitter
Walden (OR)
Walsh
Wamp
Weldon (FL)
Weldon (PA)
Weller
Whitfield
Wicker
Wilson (NM)
Wilson (SC)
Wolf
Young (AK)
Young (FL)

—- NAYS    186 —

Abercrombie
Ackerman
Allen
Andrews
Baca
Baird
Baldwin
Bass
Becerra
Bell
Berkley
Berman
Biggert
Bishop (NY)
Blumenauer
Bono
Boswell
Brady (PA)
Brown (OH)
Butterfield
Capps
Capuano
Cardin
Cardoza
Carson (IN)
Case
Castle
Clay
Clyburn
Conyers
Cox
Crowley
Cummings
Davis (CA)
Davis (FL)
DeFazio
DeGette
Delahunt
DeLauro
Deutsch
Dicks
Dingell
Doggett
Dooley (CA)
Doyle
Dreier
Emanuel
Engel
Eshoo
Evans
Farr
Fattah
Filner
Foley
Frank (MA)
Frelinghuysen
Frost
Gephardt
Gerlach
Gibbons
Gilchrest
Gonzalez
Green (TX)
Greenwood
Grijalva
Gutierrez
Hill
Hinchey
Hinojosa
Hobson
Hoeffel
Holt
Honda
Hooley (OR)
Hostettler
Houghton
Hoyer
Inslee
Israel
Jackson (IL)
Jackson-Lee (TX)
Johnson (CT)
Johnson, E. B.
Jones (OH)
Kanjorski
Kaptur
Kennedy (RI)
Kildee
Kilpatrick
Kind
Kirk
Kleczka
Knollenberg
Kolbe
Kucinich
Langevin
Lantos
Larsen (WA)
Larson (CT)
Leach
Lee
Levin
Lewis (GA)
Lipinski
Lofgren
Lowey
Lynch
Majette
Maloney
Markey
Matsui
McCarthy (MO)
McCarthy (NY)
McCollum
McDermott
McGovern
McInnis
McNulty
Meehan
Michaud
Millender-McDonald
Miller (NC)
Miller, George
Mollohan
Moore
Moran (VA)
Nadler
Napolitano
Neal (MA)
Obey
Olver
Ose
Owens
Pallone
Pascrell
Pastor
Paul
Payne
Pelosi
Pomeroy
Price (NC)
Pryce (OH)
Rodriguez
Rothman
Roybal-Allard
Ruppersberger
Rush
Ryan (OH)
Sabo
Sánchez, Linda T.
Sanchez, Loretta
Sanders
Schakowsky
Schiff
Scott (VA)
Serrano
Shays
Sherman
Simmons
Slaughter
Smith (WA)
Snyder
Solis
Stark
Strickland
Stupak
Sweeney
Tauscher
Thompson (CA)
Tierney
Towns
Turner (TX)
Udall (CO)
Udall (NM)
Van Hollen
Velázquez
Visclosky
Waters
Watson
Watt
Waxman
Weiner
Wexler
Woolsey
Wu
Wynn

—- NOT VOTING    20 —

Boehlert
Brown, Corrine
Cannon
Davis (IL)
Diaz-Balart, L.
Diaz-Balart, M.
Dunn
Harman
Hastings (FL)
Hunter
Meek (FL)
Meeks (NY)
Menendez
Murtha
Nethercutt
Oberstar
Rangel
Reyes
Ros-Lehtinen
Tauzin

I think we’d have to know more to say what Dr. Paul intends, above and beyond keeping the federal government out of what states choose to do, and allowing them to each decide whether to have gay marriage — the position gay author Jonathan Rauch argued for in his book on gay marriage as the one most likely to achieve gay marriage without legislative or electoral backlash.  He may personally not care for gay marriage — he is an old Texan after all, one who has been famously assaulted by someone pretending to be gay on the big screen.  He may also be changing his position over time, as he did on DADT.

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